Journal cover Journal topic
Earth Surface Dynamics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 2.000 IF 2.000
  • IF 5-year<br/> value: 2.000 IF 5-year
    2.000
  • SNIP value: indexed SNIP
    indexed
  • IPP value: indexed IPP
    indexed
  • SJR value: indexed SJR
    indexed
ESurf cover
Open access Public peer review Article level metrics
Managing editor:
Tom
Coulthard

Editors: Frédéric Herman, Niels Hovius, Douglas Jerolmack, Andreas Lang & A. Joshua West

Earth Surface Dynamics (ESurf) is an international scientific journal dedicated to the publication and discussion of high-quality research on the physical, chemical, and biological processes shaping Earth's surface and their interactions on all scales.

The main subject areas of ESurf comprise field measurements, remote sensing, and experimental and numerical modelling of Earth surface processes, and their interactions with the lithosphere, biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and pedosphere. ESurf prioritizes studies with general implications for Earth surface science and especially values contributions that straddle discipline boundaries, enhance theory–observation feedback, and/or apply basic principles from physics, chemistry, or biology.

News

First Impact Factor for ESurf

15 Jun 2015

The ESurf editors are delighted to announce that Earth Surface Dynamics (ESurf) has received its first Impact Factor.

ESurf introduces reduced article processing charges

17 Jun 2016

Earth Surface Dynamics (ESurf) introduces reduced article processing charges (APCs) to be paid by the authors (or their institution) for any manuscripts submitted from 1 July 2016.

Workflow of ESurf reorganized

10 Dec 2015

We have summarized the upcoming changes to ESurf by the end of the year.

Recent articles

Highlight articles

Accurately predicting gravel transport rates in mountain rivers is difficult because of feedbacks with channel morphology. River bed surfaces evolve during floods, influencing transport rates. I propose that the threshold of gravel motion is a state variable for channel reach evolution. I develop a new model to predict how transport thresholds evolve as a function of transport rate, and then use laboratory flume experiments to calibrate and validate the model.

J. P. L. Johnson

In regions formerly, or currently, covered by glaciers, landscapes have largely been shaped by glaciers. Glaciers erode bedrock through three main mechanisms: abrasion, quarrying, and subglacial meltwater erosion (SME). The latter, however, remains enigmatic. We present the first numerical modelling study of bedrock erosion by subglacial water and find that SME is negligible compared to abrasion and quarrying across the glacier, but its localization can explain the formation of bedrock channels.

F. Beaud, G. E. Flowers, and J. G. Venditti

A physical scale model of a gravel-bed braided river was used to measure vertical grain size sorting in the morphological active layer defined as the bed material between the maximum and minimum bed elevation. By normalizing active layer thickness and dividing into 10 sublayers we show that all grain sizes occur with almost equal frequency in all sublayers. Occurrence of patches and strings of coarser material relates to preservation of particular morphotextural features within the active layer.

P. Leduc, P. Ashmore, and J. T. Gardner

We use ice-penetrating-radar data to identify a laterally continuous, gently sloping topographic block, comprising two surfaces separated by a distinct break in slope, preserved beneath the Institute and Möller ice streams, West Antarctica. We interpret these features as extensive erosion surfaces, showing that ancient (pre-glacial) surfaces can be preserved at low elevations beneath ice sheets. Different erosion regimes (e.g. fluvial and marine) may have formed these surfaces.

K. C. Rose, N. Ross, R. G. Bingham, H. F. J. Corr, F. Ferraccioli, T. A. Jordan, A. M. Le Brocq, D. M. Rippin, and M. J. Siegert

In this work we present DeltaRCM, a reduced-complexity model for river delta formation. It is a rule-based cellular morphodynamic model, in contrast to reductionist models based on detailed computational fluid dynamics. DeltaRCM is able to resolve channel dynamics and to produce stratigraphy. We also explain the meaning of complexity reduction, especially  the essential processes to be included in modeling deltas.

M. Liang, V. R. Voller, and C. Paola

Publications Copernicus